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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN2 6
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
an end to the war on budget deficits and pledging to fight the deficit of opportunity for the poor and middle class. in a speech wednesday on his economic priorities, the president said the federal deficit is under control and doesn't present a serious threat to the economy. he focused on the gap between the rich and the poor and making the case for raising the minimum wage to more than $10. while extending unemployment benefits. >> we know that we're going to have greater and greater portion of our people in the service sector and we know that there are airport workers and fast food workers and nurse assistants and retail salespeople who work their tails off and are still living at or barely above poverty and that is why it's well past the time to raise a minimum wage that in real terms right now is below it was than when harry truman was in office. >> republican leaders quickly took issue with the president's poach. house speaker john boehner suggesting the president's policies created the very problems that he described. >> meanwhile republicans and democrats are trying to hamme
administrations have danced around the mission of our infrastructure deficit. for all the attention to the various fiscal cliffs, the looming infrastructure deficit is every bit as critical. for two centuries, infrastructure was a bipartisan issue, from lincoln with the transcontinental railroad to democrats and republicans coming together to launch the interstate freeway system, signed into law by president eisenhower, subsequent roads, transit and water investments helped fuel our economy and tie the nation together. more recently, the failure to address long-term funding has also been bipartisan. the bush administration ignored strong recommendations from their own private sector experts that they impaneled to give advice. although the obama administration did request and employ some modest funding in the recovery act and has proposed an infrastructure bank and talked extensively and i think sincerely about the need for investment, what has been lacking has been a specific concrete proposal from either party to address infrastructure financing in america. while the political maneuvering has sec
's infrastructure deficit. roads, bridges, transit systems are all increasingly at risk. we are facing an inadequate state of repair, construction of new facilities are on hold and we are losing ground in meeting our own needs, let alone the challenges of global competition. yet, this challenge is an opportunity for some potential progress. we know what to do to meet this challenge. we can write a new transportation bill that will meet today's needs. it just needs more money. there is a vast coalition that supports additional resources for infrastructure. the so-called special interests that are so often at odds are remarkably aligned when it comes time to recognize and fix this problem. business, labor, professional groups, local government, environmentalists, truckers, bicyclists all agree. the paralysis that surrounds questions of raising taxes does not necessarily need to apply in this case. ronald reagan, after all, was willing to sign into law a five cent gasoline tax increase 31 years ago when a nickel a gallon was real money. a user fee is in fact a different category from a general tax incr
decade or so. deficits being reduced. all sorts of cuts all over throughout this government. we're in a recovery from a recession. we're not adding federal jobs. and so the idea that he is sort of taking this government in a direction that it's never been in before is absolutely absurd. and just a little more history here. history will say this is the president only in this period of time who talked about contracting executive power. he's the only one who is publicly talking about reeling in executive power. when he responded to the heckler for the immigration piece, he's talking about really inexecutive power, let's do it through legislative processes instead of through executive orders. so you won't see any other modern era presidents talk about it. certainly no one previous in our lifetime to president obama. >> some happened with don't ask, don't tell. oppose the left people saying he should do something in executive order and he wanted to go through congress. so krystal, is the point hear really that republicans are facing the frustration of knowing that president obama did
. caller: good morning, america. in 2008, obama came in. a budget deficit. $9.6 trillion deficit. in, america hired democrat congress, senate, president. they stuffed obama down our throats without any consent from republicans. here we are $17 trillion in debt. benghazi, mexico. people whove the believesnd what obama -- shutting down businesses. these democrats have done enough. harry reid has not passed a budget in this country in six years. where is the outrage there? we have no budget. where's the outrage? we are a country with no budget. you run your household with no budget? they are stealing the money to go back to the campaigns, to a democrats. wake up and look at the democrats -- facts. this guy's a socialist and that is what will be coming. god bless us all. host: former president bill clinton weighed in on the health care law i while ago, saying that the president should keep his pledge on if you like your you -- insurance you should keep it. was interviewed yesterday and asked about why he made those comments. [video clip] is it because you are setting the way for mrs. cli
the surplus but they also share the deficits so if there is a regional deficit, the pain will be shared in terms of frankly rolling blackouts if it comes to that. we can hope for a cool summer in the summer of 2016 that's not necessarily a prudent approach. with that i would be happy to answer any questions. >> our next witness is mr. john morrissey and you are recognized for five minutes. >> good morning chairman, ranking member and members of the subcommittee for holding this hearing and the opportunity to testify. as i acknowledged there is a significant change occurring on the energy landscape. the operation in america has experienced only a modest incremental change over the last decades yet in recent years the development of new technology is bringing much more rapid change to the system that can't be disruptive. i think embracing these changes will allow a much more efficient utilization of energy resources. the challenge before us is to enable the system to be more efficient through the utilization of technology and foster the development of a diverse set of competitive energy r
for the month. also out today we have third quarter productivity, trade deficit, new home sale, manufacturing index and beige book. jp morgan chase and citibank is among those assessed $2.3 billion. society general, royal bank of scotland were among those fined. sears executive has reduced the stake to 48.4% down from the prior 55.4%. investors that decided to exit lam pert's stake shares were down. >> thanks. i was going to see how much -- he's still loaded, $5.9 billion. he still has half. >> roughly, yeah. >> let's get a check on gold prices and currency levels. joining us now the bks management, shaun is editor of the wealth report. our guest host wants to talk. can you say it? can't talk about it if i can't say it. what was the news? number in in terms of reserve currencies. >> in materiaterms of trade. the chinese economy and society itself becomes more open. it's a transactional unit. there's too much issue from property rights point of view to trust as a reserve currency. >> what about the reports coming out of the saudi arabia that they're negotiating with the chinese to pay for oil?
. budget deficit $380 million. 17.7% unemployment rate and a quarter of a million people have dropped from the population and down to 700,000 people today. matt, obviously no one wants to see the pensioners who have been used to living on a concern check get less, but it doesn't seem like there is any choices here other than that. >> i don't think anybody wants to see something relying on the pension check to pay their mortgage or food on table, but at the same time, i don't know where the money is coming from. the for ever cents detroit is bringing in 45 cents is going toward debt and it is going to go up to 60 cents they say. >> we have seen this across the county where public unions have cut deals with the government. they are i scratch your back you scratch mine. and that is how this ballooned into this situation where they made promises they can not keep. >> a lot of deals took place a long time ago. but you are running out ouf mof money. detroit, for example, has twice as many pensioners as they do employers in the city. it comes done to math. you have to bring in x-amount of dollars
of congress be ineligible for re-election if they don't beat search benchmarks, like the deficit being beneath a certain percentage of the gdp. it's a lot. >> or certain congressman who get a lot of air time like paul ryan and that's a taste of what we'll see pretty soon. ronan, thanks for stopping by today. today's producer pick comes to us from associate producer kristen bukaria. a georgia court has ordered a man to pay up for breaking his promise to marry. he owes his one-time fiance 50,000 large even though the man claims he never officially popped the question. you can read more by heading to thomas roberts facebook page. you've got to put a ring on it, nice tune. we'll be right back. ♪ if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further damage. doctors have been prescribing humira for over ten years. humira works by targeting and helping to block a specifi
for the footprint and recall that under the miso agreement they all showed a surplus but they also share the deficit. so if there's a regional deficit, the pain will be shared in terms of frankly rolling blackouts if it comes to that. we can hope for a cool summer in the summer of 2016, but that's not necessary a prudent approach. so with that i would be happy to answer any questions at the appropriate time. >> thank you, mr. moeller. our next witness is mr. john norris. you are recognized for five minutes. >> good morning, chairman whitfield, ranking member mcnerney, and members of the subcommittee. thank you calling this thing. and the opportunity to testify. as i acknowledged in a written test with their significant changes occurring on our energy landscape. the operation of our energy system in america has experienced in my view only modest incremental change over the last many decades. yet in recent years the rapid development of new technologies is bringing much more rapid change to the system. that change can be disruptive. i think embracing these changes will allow a much more efficient util
taking office, he faced a largest per capita deficit in the country. total debt of about $3.5 billion. before taking office, he did several terms as mayor of stanford, connecticut from 1995 to 2009. and what's particularly relevant today for this conversation is promising to make 2012 the year of education in connecticut. he tackled reform agenda and a state long been known for one of the nation's widest racial achievement gaps. and the governor took the lead of passing one of the nation's more dramatic education bills signed in maif of 2012. it was public act 12116 and act concerning education reform. some of the packages most significant features required a new teacher evaluation pilot in which 5% of the evaluation will be based on student learning. the governor's package created a commissioner's networking similar to the recovery school direct in louisiana. which is the ability to take authority over 25 of the state's lowest performing schools to date. 11 have been entered to the networking. and increased per pupil charter school funding to $10,500 in fiscal 2013. it will go to $11
-capita deficit representing 17% of total revenue and therefore i had to go in a different direction. when a lot of states were saying we have to cut, realizing that our gap was too big to cut her way out of it and too big to tax her way out of it and had to be a combination of two. someone had to explain what we are trying to do and when it came to education i did that as well. there were a lot of people mad at me and a lot of folks betting a lot of money to try to defeat and organized efforts even though they supported certain aspects of it. it was the total picture they didn't want to see and it might carve out a corner that they like but that was the total picture. somebody has to have the discussion. someone has to have that discussion with the communities and someone has to demonstrate to members of the legislature that you want to work with him and get their input that we need to change directions. go back to hartford new haven ridge ford new london new britain failing to properly educate 40% of their kids. those are some the largest school districts. you can't succeed as a state when you
were to continue, would lead to greater federal deficit, which would eventually reduce the nation's output in income, slightly what would occur under current law. so i believe we should be focused on how we get folks back to work. that is where the house has been focused. unfortunately, after 140-some bills we passed over to the senate, they still await even consideration at all by that body. so with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman for his comment. we need to have the -- we don't have the time nor the inclination of going through the bills which the gentleman refers as jobs bills. of course we have an alternative and mr. van hollen will be talking about that in terms of jobs, investment, infrastructure, investment in education and growing jobs for our people. but the fact of the matter is, mr. speaker, there are 1.3 million people who can't find a job. to say that they will be disincentivized because we continue to give them some support so they can survive and their families can survive during the period of time that they're looking for a job, th
challenges that your country is, and we went through a strategic review several years ago and a deficit reduction action plan, all of which has decreased our budget by 10-15%. and and this has required all kinds of trade-offs along the way too. going forward and recently we just had the speech which indicates that the government is looking to refurbish their canada first defense strategy and in that way allows us to look at where we can invest in new areas. so there will be trade-offs to come certainly within a stable envelope of tight resources. >> okay. and then the last question i wanted to ask is on author rad. norad. and you mentioned in your comments that, expansion, if you will, into the maritime domain, i think there's a lot of interest, too, in cyber domain, and you did reference the author rad strategic -- norad strategic review that's underway. can you give us some insights into what the u.s. and canada are exploring into that strategic review and what types of changes we might expect to see come out of that? >> i know that the commander of norad who is not only the u.s. comm
. the possibilities of how to cut the deficit, that's all been discussed over and over ad nauseam again. if we talk about spectrum sales one more time, i think people will start passing out. it's all about the political will. is the political will there this time? >> the calculation has been the pain will inspire political will. we haven't seen this before. every time people say it's going to be fine, we're not going to have a shutdown or play chicken with the fiscal cliff and we do. here's what's perhaps a little bit different, the fact they're negotiating in good faith in private is good. the question will be can republicans accept any revenues from closed loopholes or is that off hand? >> they need to cut. they're on solid ground in terms of wanting to cut. they voted for the sequester. that was a mistake. i like the quiet. >> reality check here, both the democrat and republican version are austerity budgets, the question to what degree. >> hopefully they do the smart thing administratively and give the power of cutting back to the agencies. these guys shouldn't be figuring what cuts to make. >>
entitlements and the big issues contributing to the debt and deficit. >> we'll see what they can come up with between now and then. that's it for me. i'm be back 5:00 p.m. eastern in "the situation room." "newsroom" continues right now with brooke baldwin. >>> hi, there. i'm brooke baldwin live in new york today. we begin with a story that absolutely broke the nation's heart. i'll never forget it. i was there in newtown. i saw first hand the utter devastation, the anguish upon the faces of those in the community, the first responders, the children because of the shooting at sandy hook elementary school. i talk eed to a first responder trembling with grief. i saw the funeral processions with the tiny white caskets for young first grade victims, and moments ago, we got the 911 calls, these tapes, from that mass shooting in this quaint connecticut town. the 911 calls from inside the school where a gunman murdered 20 children and 6 adults. this is an extraordinarily difficult story to cover today. the release of the tapes, obviously, extremely sensitive. we are fully aware of that he
, on the economy, on health care, on the deficit. that's very specific and has an impact on next year's elections. >> tonight, chris will afford us all the opportunity to watch the president of the united states. >> "hardball" is kicking you know what? it's kicking it old school, man. remember we used to watch "who wants to be a millionaire" and regis had to be on every night. chris was on at 2:00 and 3:00, 12 times a day. he's on 7:00 now. boom. the number one show. >> more popular than peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. >> you embarrass me, joe. >> not so easily embarrassed, chris. i assure our audience. >> i think it's interesting, joe. you ask the greatest question tonight. you know the business. i don't usually need them. i enjoy just duking it out with politicians at a distance. i don't need to beg them to come on my show. i always thought, i see the president pop up on different kind of show, entertainment shows like letterman and leno and i'm thinking why can't we get them. they made some decisions in the white house and may have to do with these numbers you guys are talking about. the p
to cut the deficit in half. not true. remember it was about two weeks ago, three weeks ago where the white house said we're going to have this technical -- we're going to have a tech surge to fix this website. you know what? according to "the new york times," you know how many people were in the tech surge? >> how many? >> six. six people in the tech surge. it really was kind of a p.r. stunt. >> unfortunately it's on the backs. american people. they are 5% roughly, of the 7 million enrolled, they need to have 7 million enrolled to pay for this program, so why tell the truth when the lie will get them there? >> only 15%, they are still behind. >> we'll keep you posted on all that. in the meantime, good morning. heather nauert. >> peter, nice to see you. got news to bring you. we begin with a fox news alert. an update on that deadly train derailment in new york. investigators say that train was going 82 miles per hour in a 30 mile per hour zone, this happening early sunday morning. all seven cars jumped the tracks killing four people and injuring dozens of others. the engineer has
taxes, sales tax. we have all budget surplus, i walked in with a budget deficit, i now have a $1.2 billion surplus. we're making our economy the opportunity economy where, you know, if you want to build a business, you can -- and you want to get a job, you come to florida. >> your unemployment rate has dropped quicker than any other state, i know that. and you're now -- >> 6.7 -- >> which is below, we got down to -- >> 7%. >> i don't know, yeah. anyway, you're at 6.7%, were you higher? i would think you'd always be below. >> unemployment went from 3.5% to 11.1%. >> where was the national average? >> 9%. >> never got above -- >> i think it was nine when i came -- >> maybe ten. >> i think it was nine when i came in. in the month of october, we generated private sector jobs, my good friend governor perry, only had 12,000 jobs. >> oh, you two guys go at each other. i see that a lot. that's a great rivalry. almost like a football -- >> he was number one. what do you want to be? i want to be number one. so i go after number one. >> what's the minimum wage? >> it's $7.67. >> is that a w
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)